Meet the Scientists, March 2019. Standing Still and Stable

On Saturday 16th of March, a group of us (PhD students Rory Curtis, Barbara Grant and Nicholas Thomas, as well as myself) had the opportunity to continue our lab's ongoing involvement in the popular Meet the Scientists outreach event at the World Museum in Liverpool. The central theme this time was “Healthy Living for Longer”, …

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BigFoot50 Part 2: Using biomechanical models to predict muscle functions during walking over different surfaces

If you missed Part 1 of this post from PhD student Barbara Grant, check it out! Evolutionary theories of bipedal walking in ancient humans usually stem from fossil feet or footprints. Yet, exactly how the shape of these fossils relates to muscle function during walking is usually inferred from modern humans. That being said, we …

Continue reading BigFoot50 Part 2: Using biomechanical models to predict muscle functions during walking over different surfaces

BigFoot50 Part 1: These feet were made for walking

The average person won’t spend too much time thinking about the way we walk. It’s just a simple thoughtless process we do every day. However, there is actually a complex series of muscles, ligaments and bones triggered to drive this forward momentum. Human walking depends entirely on the ability of the foot to exert the …

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A peak into my PhD: The influence of ecology, biomechanics and locomotor style on the body shape of animals

Body shape has a fundamental impact on organismal function. Most studies on body shape in vertebrates are focused on research into reptiles (mostly fossorial species) and aquatic or semi-aquatic vertebrates, but it is largely unknown (in a quantitative way) how body shape has evolved in concert with changes in behaviour, locomotion and ecological niches. My objectives …

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Get the picture: Using photogrammetry as a measure for comparing surfaces

When I first started my PhD over a year ago, I was told to expect the unexpected when it came to research. Lo and behold, for several weekends of the last few months I have been taking 100's of pictures of the floor outside, all part of my research. Given that my background is in …

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